North Creake - UK Airfield Guide

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North Creake





NORTH CREAKE: Military aerodrome   (also known as EGMERE)

Aerial view 1999
Aerial view 1999
Aerial view 2018
Aerial view 2018

Note: These pictures were both obtained from Google Earth ©







 

 

Evidence of the three runways can still be clearly seen, but, the perimeter track still appears to be intact around the entire airfield site. One thing is certain, and that is that farmers taking over disused airfields appreciated the usefulness of 'peri-tracks' to serve their own needs. And indeed these still serve, mostly more or less intact, some seventy or more years after WW2.
 

Military users: WW2: RAF Bomber Command            100 (Special Duties) Group

171  Sqdn   (Handley Page Halifaxs & Short Stirlings)

199  Sqdn   (Halifaxs & Stirlings)
 

Location: 2nm NW of Little Walsingham

Period of operation: 1943 to 1948
 

Runways: 06/24   1829x46   hard           13/31   1280x46   hard
                01/19   1280x46   hard
 

NOTES: This site, it appears, started off in 1941 as a decoy airfield for DOCKING about 7nm to the west. In 1942 construction started and this airfield was originally intended to be a satellite for FOULSHAM.



BOMBER COMMAND ARRIVE
In December 1943 it was completed and taken over by Bomber Command 100 Group, who were operating heavy bombers, and, surprise, surprise, therefore requiring additional work to the runways and perimeter track. Nice to see the English were so focused on the task in hand, (I don’t think!), considering a pretty serious war was happening at that time.



GIVE IT A YEAR
With typical British efficiency in January 1944 the airfield was then put to Care & Maintenance duties and from April used for training by a Mobile Signals Unit. But, by mid April a Station Flight was formed using a Tiger Moth. Gawd bless the RAF!

On the 1st May 199 Sqdn arrived with Short Stirling Mk IIIs. On D-Day they assisted by simulating a large force of aircraft and surface vessels ‘invading’ Calais. As a ‘reward’ the Station Flight Tiger Moth was replaced by an Airspeed Oxford.



SPECIAL TASKS
The Short Stirlings of both 171 and 199 Sqdns were replaced by Handley Page Halifaxs during 1944 through to early 1945. It can only be wondered what the aircrews thought at that time operating obsolete types? This said, although the two squadrons did fly ‘normal’ bombing operations, their aircraft were fitted out with special counter-measure equipment such as ‘Window’ and ‘Mandrel’.



AFTER WW2
I suppose I should mention that soon after WW2 ended both 171 and 199 Sqdns were disbanded in July 1945 and in October 1945 the station was transferred to 41 Group Maintenance Command becoming No. 111 Sub-Storage Site of 274 Maintenance Unit based at SWANNINGTON.

It seems that their task was long-term storage of Mosquitos and eventually these were taken out of storage, flight tested and delivered to other RAF units, and, the Turkish Air Force.

 

 

 

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