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A Guide to the history of British flying sites within the United Kingdom
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Buchans Farm


BUCHAN'S FARM:  Temporary aerodrome         (Aka CORSTORPHINE)


Operated by:  Robert B Slack

Location:  About 4nm W of Edinburgh city centre

Period of operation:  22nd to 26th July 1912


A MICHAEL T HOLDER GALLERY
We have Mike Holder, a great friend of this 'Guide', to thank for investigating this little known venue and providing the following items.

Local map c.1914
Local map c.1914
Notice
Notice
Local area map c.1929
Local area map c.1929


The Notice was published in the Edinburgh Evening News on the 18th July 1912.






Article One
Article One
Aerial photo c.1945
Aerial photo c.1945
Article Two
Article Two
Modern map
Modern map











 

Article One was published in the Dalkeith Advertiser on the 25th July 1912. Article Two was also published on the 25th July, but this time in the The Scotsman.


Google Earth © detail
Google Earth © detail
Article Three
Article Three
Local area view
Local area view

Article Three was published in the The Scotsman on the 27th July 1912. The local area view is from my Google Earth © derived database.


 





NOTES:  Robert Bertram Slack obtained his Royal Aero Club pilots certificate on the 14th November 1911. We need to bear in mind that in those days the degree of flying skills required to give "a public exhibition of flying", (as displays were mostly called), were fairly limited and just being able to perform a couple of circuits was quite enough to attract large crowds - many if not most of whom had never seen an aeroplane actually flying!  

Those machines, as aeroplanes were called, were very basic indeed, and the Blériot monoplane Robert Slack was flying was very much 'state of the art'. I find it fascinating to discover just how quickly those early aviators were making advances, mostly small advances of course by and large, but hugely important.

Just as an aside, simply attempting to record the flying sites in the UK is really quite a task. The early history of powered aviation is also still very much a 'work in progress'. Indeed, it has been claimed for many years that the first ever loop performed was at the Blériot school, Pau, in central France, by Adolph Pégoud on the 21st September 1913. It now appears that the Russian pilot, Pyotr Nikolayevich Nesterov, had performed a loop twelve days earlier.

We will never know how far Robert Slack might have progressed his flying career. Sadly he died in a motoring accident on the 21st December 1913, aged just 28.


AND, LAST BUT NOT LEAST

Photo with caption
Photo with caption


Later Mike Holder discovered this group picture, taken alongside Robert Slack's Blériot, and including him, which was published in The Aeroplane on the 1st August 1912.






 

 

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